As the sports year begins to finally come to a close, this also means we have to look at how things are going to be occurring over the coming year. COVID-19 has still limited how the practice facilities can work and leagues can perform but this hasn’t stopped anyone yet from trying to see what they can do.

 

The NFL was able to complete their draft virtually, giving viewers a different kind of experience while still delivering the same old takes of players getting the chance to at least be signed by a pro football team. La Liga, the premiere Spanish soccer league, has elected to play behind closed doors until 2021 as a precaution to keep fans from getting sick. Other leagues like the NHL and NASCAR have been working towards potential ways to at least get their leagues going again, even if there are no fans in attendance.

 

While I admit I wouldn’t mind seeing everything back in action sooner than later, I’m still concerned that there might be a slip up somewhere that brings everything to a screeching halt once more. Sports leagues need to handle this very carefully if they want to try and bring back athletes competing against each other. There is no right way that I can see sports returning to normal unless we have a guaranteed way to ensure minimal harm to the public. 

 

At the same time, it’s still good to see athletes trying to do their best to help the communities and contribute to make everyone’s life that much better. Even if they might be in a much better setup and can live better than others in their cities, I’ve started to see athletes do their part to keep their fans from having to suffer. At the very least, it’s another way to let people know that there are those out there who care for them. 

 

Browns wide receiver Jarvis Landry made a purchase to help get hygiene products for families that attend schools in the East Cleveland area. A few NBA players who were infected with COVID-19 have offered to donate their plasma in an effort to contribute to the process of finding a cure and vaccine for the disease. Golden State Warriors star Stephen Curry even went a step further to help educate his social media followers as well as anyone else who was curious, as he had a 30-minute interview with Dr. Anthony Fauci to try and see what all he could tell his audience. 

 

Sports not happening doesn’t mean that the athletic world will be on pause forever. At some point, there will be a chance for stadiums to be safely filled with fans once again as everyone is able to watch their favorite teams in action once more. The unifying factor that athletics can have, no matter what the event is, is hard to keep down forever.

 

Until then, all I think we can do is wait and act as safely as possible. There’s a difference between rushing to compete for money and competing because at some point, the show will go on. I for one cannot wait until the show is safe to go on, and I’ll be ready to react every step of the way.

 

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